Bron|x|Museum Teen Council
 
Keith was a very unique person. He didn’t do art for fame or fashion; he did it because he wanted to. When you look at his art they have different stories or different meanings. When he did his work everything came from his head it wasn’t something he had planned. He managed to draw from his heart. He managed to connect with people no matter who you are big, small, black or white. His artwork was simple but it said a lot. This is one of his artworks below.

I thought this image above meant  someone who is different from everyone can easily be accepted in society and take in their cuulture. It's up to you so you can have an open-mind on why I thought of this interpretation.

Keith also made big sculpture for the childrens hospital. The reason why he did it was to show hope for the kids and to let them play and have fun with his sculpture. 

 
 
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By Eric Avila

What is Teen Council?

The Bronx Teen Council is an internship where teens have the opportunity to learn more about the art scene of New York and to create MuseZines (mini magazines) and MuseCasts (videos).  There are 13 members of Teen Council and over eighty apply so competition is pretty fierce to be a part of it. So far in Teen Council we have done multiple group activities to break the ice between the council members.  One of our first activities required a lot of trust. Basically, 1 member had to hold up a sheet with dots on it while the other member was on the other side of the paper with a marker on a microphone stand. The person behind the marker/microphone had to tell the other member where to move the paper to connect the dots.  This activity was surprisingly effective at bonding the members. 

The Silent Movie
Our first project in Teen Council was to make a silent movie. We were placed in groups and put our minds together to create a good silent movie. After 3 days the projects were finally finished and we presented them to each other. The projects were pretty fun to create and very diverse. 

Field Trip
The first trip was to this section of Lower Manhattan at 10th Ave. We visited a non-profit art space called Exit Art where we saw many pictures that depicted symbols of hatred in the 20th century (e.g. The Nazi eagle, a video of a minstrel show, and many other forms of hatred). After leaving Exit Art we decided to visit the Highline Elevated Park since it was close by and we ended up visiting the Chelsea Galleries, which is located in the Meatpacking district of downtown NY.  After visiting the galleries we stopped at a bakery and celebrated 2 Teen Council members’ birthdays with red velvet cupcakes.  So far, Teen Council is a blast and it’s a great program to be a part of. 

 
 
This week the teens are focusing on comics and developing narratives inspired by the Bronx borough with teaching artist Ivan Velez Jr.  
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The teens this week are working with storyteller Master Lee to craft stories inspired by the artwork in the exhibitions Urban Archives: Emilio Sanchez in the Bronx and AIM: Bronx Calling. The teens are discovering new ways to tell stories and are slowly coming out of their shells.
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The participants in the Teen Summer Program are working hard to edit their podcasts for the Museum's current exhibition Urban Archives: Emiliio Sanchez in the Bronx. Below are a few pictures of them hard at work with teaching artist Laura Napier!
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We have a new group of eager teens for a month this summer to work on various projects inspired by the Museum's current exhibition, "Urban Archives: Emilio Sanchez in the Bronx". This week, the teens went out to Hunts Point in the Bronx where Emilio Sanchez drew his inspiration from. The teens recorded various sounds and interviewed several individuals in the area, which will be made into podcasts soon (so stay tuned!). Below are a few pictures and reflections from our trip. 
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Today was our last session before the winter vacation! We celebrated the end of our first semester with a potluck of tasty foods made by Teen Council members, a screening of 3 MuseCast videos created/produced by TC members, and some other fun activities. Here are a few pictures to sum up the festivities. Enjoy and happy holidays!
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Well what can I say about this year? So far things are going pretty well. I haven’t really been here as much as I wanted to be due to lawyer complications and such n’ such. However the Zine looks really awesome!! I loved working on this project because it was made up of things that I’m concerned about and things that I love to do. I would have to say my favorite part was taking pictures in the freezing cold with Hector! That was a hilarious moment!  (But kind of annoying… Being that I couldn’t feel my hands...) But all in all everything was really fun to work on and I can’t wait to work on the next one!
-Will.i.Am
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My name is Scarlett Diaz  Pichardo, I am 8 years old. I am from Dominican Republic. I am a student from Ellis Preparatory Academy. This year I am a part of the Teen Council at The Bronx Museum Of the Arts. I started to learn how to work in groups and to practice my English. This semester in Teen Council I found new friends and people that care about me.

I feel so happy because I noticed I improved my English when I have to talk every Wednesday and Saturday with my peers.  I leaned what is the difference between a museum and a gallery. By being part of the teen council, it helped me a lot because I  learned  to respect what other people think and believe. When we work in groups we work together and every one gives their opinion and we respect each other. It is great because now we work as a community.

The teen council helps me in my school too because now I don’t feel scared when I have to speak English. In conclusion I what to thank every one in the teen council for helping me in everything  that I need and also to teach me how to be organized. I love it

By: Scarlett
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This semester at the internship, in my opinion, is a microcosm of what my future may be like. I desire to be an illustrator and/or writer, preferably one who is serialized in a magazine or a newspaper. At the museum, we release a seasonal magazine, so I expect a job to have the same requirements: writing a storyline, having a point for writing the story, drawing out the illustrations, meeting the deadlines, and being content with what I create.

In October, Abiel, Priscilla, and I shot a short silent video. It was a comedic short about two friends who wanted to show their incredible dancing skills to another less than interested friend. I liked the video very much, but the film that we had watched beforehand, Le voyage dans la lune, had too much of an effect on how our video was filmed. We kept the camera stationary, as filmmakers did in the early 20th century, and did not alter the background before shooting a new scene. I paid too much attention to how films were made in those days and did not think about how films are made today. 100 years after the release of La voyage dans la lune, humans have much more technology and more ways to use past technology. Early filmmakers did not move the camera out of necessity, while I made the choice not to move the camera.

Watching that film is the oldest memory of this internship and my favorite. Besides the French accent of the announcer who replaces the French commentary of the film, I loved the creativity of the plot. The use of a cannon as a medium to reach the moon, an idea sometimes used in modern culture, is nevertheless ingenious. The ability to tell a story without the characters speaking is sometimes that I do not see currently as most stories tend to depend on speech in order to convey the overall message.

When the time came to write and draw the comic for this semester’s Musezine, I was writing the storyline, drawing backgrounds and character designs, writing reflection papers for my Church History class, reading textbook chapters for my AP Biology class, reading novels for my AP English class, applying to various colleges, and spending time with my friends. My time was quickly consumed. For the majority of this semester, I did not do anything about it, which is obviously a problem. Procrastination is hereditary, and I have been a procrastinator since my mother asked me to do some form of work. My time management skills have improved slightly, but I still have a ways to go. My work, both at school and at the museum, has been affected negatively by my procrastination. In the future, I plan to collaborate with someone else so that I do not have to be responsible for both the writing and drawing for a comic in the Musezine; I prefer drawing anyway.

 - Travis
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 So the past few months went by pretty quick. Met some new faces. Made some new friends. MY BEST FRIEND NOW IS BETSY!!! JFresh minds with fresh ideas, ESPECIALLY BETSY, (Betsy has a sense of humor =]) and new perspectives. Overall pleasant from the beginning. We have just completed our first Musezine together. I have the feeling it’s going to be a great piece of work that we will be proud to call our own. This year there is a wider variety of different talents. There are those who prefer      cartooning or illustration. Some sculpting and filming. Even poetry and freestyling! I remember before when I was freestyling with Jonathan on the D train on our way back from the Chelsea galleries. I also remember when we were all first introduced to each other. It was as if we all already new each other. Sure we all didn’t just jump into conversation, but there was a sense of familiarity amongst strangers. We went to the table telling some background information about hobbies and what we like and there was a lot more in common then met the eye. I look forward to continue working with fellow peers.

- Hector
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On my first day, ‘til now, working in the Bronx Museum has been useful to my advantage. Accepting this job keeps me closer to the memories of my younger kid days growing up on 167 Grand Concourse. Being a part of the Teen Council opened my mind to creative thinking in ways that express what I think about the world around me using my own ideas. Working side by side with recent Teen Council members and new members like myself, has been a great experience and honor. After my second week in the Bronx Museum it became a comfortable zone where I can develop a positive influential attitude towards human media and about life.

- Jonathan
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Most Memorable Moments with Teen Council
 1)The Interview

I believe it was the day before the interview when my mom, brother, and I went to J.C. Penney to meet my dad and some of my cousins. Mom decided that I needed a dressy outfit for the interview even though I kept saying that I just have to wear very nice jeans and a stylish shirt, but my family is very big on making a good first impression.

Together we picked out one outfit, which I thought was enough, but mom just had to pick out two more. We agreed that the one I should wear is the dress where the bottom is a black skirt attached to a blue silky-like blouse.

On the day of the interview I put on the dress and picked out a sophisticated black handbag. As soon as I reached the Bronx Museum and after I took the elevator to the third floor of the building, I walked into a room where the other teens were waiting to see all of them, except for one, in jeans and regular shirts. Part of me felt out of place, but at the same time I felt a bit more professional than the others.  

2) Visiting the Chelsea Galleries

In September we visited the art galleries in Chelsea. The art exhibition that I remember the most vividly was one where most of the art pieces were sculptures of penises. When you enter into the building the first thing you see is a video of brightly colored penises twirling. The parts of the human body has been used in art pieces for centuries, but I found the way it was presented by this artist to be a bit weird.

 3) Seeing a Tracey Moffatt Video

In November we looked at an exhibition from the artist, Tracey Moffatt, on the first floor of the Bronx Museum. The art piece from her that really struck me was one of the videos where she took clips from movies, shows, and other footage that has something to do with artwork, or an artist. As I watched the scenes where artists become angry about their work and some of them reached to the point that they destroyed the painting they made, it reminded me about the frustration I sometimes feel when I’m working on something important to me and it does not come out the way I had first planned it.

- Abiel
 
 
Teen Council's second field trip was down to the New York Art Book Fair held at P.S.1 MoMA. We checked out the plethora of stands throughout the Fair and spent a good amount in the Artist's Zines room to draw some inspiration for our own MuseZines. 
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Hector showing his enthusiasm for the Fair
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Now it's Biaca's turn to show her excitement along with Betsy's arm with her free "Hi" fan.
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Ending the day with a fun group picture!
 
 
Our first field trip of the year! Last Saturday Teen Council traveled downtown to Exit Art and the Chelsea Galleries to explore several exhibitions. We had the pleasure of speaking with Exit Art's Assistant Curator Lauren Rosati about current exhibitions, "Alternative Histories" and "EcoKids". The following are a few entries written by TC members reflecting on their field trip experience. Enjoy!

Travis wrote...
What I learned on Saturday was that new or simply unknown artists do not have to conform to the system of museums, but instead can have their artwork in a place that is more willing to accept new, untested and unseen works of art. Most of these works, in my opinion, expressed rather modern ideas and opinions and do not seem to share the classical, nostalgic feeling of the art that is placed in most museums. I also witnessed works that had enough value in order to be placed in a gallery for sale. (I don’t think the owners of a gallery would allow artwork with no possibility of sale inside of their building.) The artwork in the galleries, compared to that in Exit Art, were more aesthetically appealing rather than attempting to convey some opinions or message.

Hector wrote...
A recent trip down to Exit Art and the Chelsea galleries was quite refreshing. Once again it opened me to world of other artists and my own personal style was updated. Seeing different methods of approaching different perspectives allowed me to gather myself and gave my mind a new coating of creativity. Visiting an alternative space such as Exit Art gave me hope in finding a starting line in my hopes of the world seeing my work.

Abiel wrote...
In today’s society art is classified as many different things and is known to push boundaries. But are there certain boundaries that shouldn’t be pushed? This is what I was wondering while in an art gallery in Chelsea viewing artworks made with images and forms of penises.

I love it when artists think outside of the box but I feel that thinking outside the box doesn’t mean you have to tear it apart and destroy the essence of it. If an artwork is giving a message by using sex organs there should be a respectable way of doing so. Nudity is used a lot in art but it’s presented in a beautiful way like having a naked woman in a graceful pose. Having a penis swing around in a circle, however, might not be so graceful.


Betsy wrote...
Going to Exit Art and seeing the galleries was a great experience. At Exit Art we learned that there is a difference between a museum and an alternative space. A museum is a place that displays preserved art by famous and well-known artists. Alternative spaces are spaces that are used by artists who are just beginning in the art industry. They use those spaces to gain experience and to have their art be seen. Exit Art showed that by displaying different boxes of these spaces, old to new, that contained information over it. One alternative space that really stood out to me was Dirty Dirty, a space started in a basement here in Brooklyn, New York.

After Exit Art we went to Chelsea to look at galleries. A gallery is a place where art is sold and it is not a museum or an alternative space. The galleries were interesting. Artists were selling installations and art pieces. The art being sold were of different sizes. Some were big as walls and others were as small as books. If I had the money I would have bought something to remind me of this day. I would have bought the motorcycle installation because it was cool [Dan Colen’s “Poetry” at Gagosian].

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